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Theropod Tutorial by Droemar Theropod Tutorial by Droemar
A sequel of sorts to the Raptor Tutorial. Again, this is as much for me as anyone else; my hope is that other people will be able to benefit from my rather nonsensical scribblings. I should be updating my comic tomorrow.

Theropods are pretty hard to nail down; saying you're going to draw them is like saying you're going to draw a canine or feline. There are a LOT of variations, and half the scientists in the world are debating who goes where. I focused on the clade that Acrocanthosaurus belongs to, because those are the ones I'm really studying. (They're the villains in mah book.) I did add T-Rex in, but mostly for the benefit of showing the pinnacle of specialization the guy was. That bulldog neck and battering ram skull more than make up for his dinky forepaws.

Theropods really were the ultimate predator. I don't care what you compare them to: sharks, orcas, tigers, bears, wolves. I have a wall chart that shows how big the various species in my book were in relation to each other, and seeing an Acro go after an Astrodon must've been like watching gods fight, let alone what a Giganotosaurus would have looked like going after an Argentinosaurus.

You just can't beat something that could run you down and eat you in a couple of bites.
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:icondinosaurboy65:
DinosaurBoy65 Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Actually the feet only had 4.
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:iconneosuchia:
Neosuchia Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2017
THANK YOU! Oh my god I've been looking for one of these for weeks
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:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2017
Awesome job!

However, why is there at least one person who starts a fight with you in your comments?
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2017
I don't know, to be honest. Everybody has their own opinions about dinosaurs and how they should be drawn, but instead of doing their own damn tutorial they tell me what's wrong with mine!
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:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2017
I guess.

Hell, there's even people who start a war over the most trivial things...
Reply
:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2017
I've been called a "feather-Nazi" on my newest raptor tutorial. I still laugh about that.
Reply
:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2017
Was it by that "urrdurrburr" guy?
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017
Probably. Sounds about right. :)
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:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017
I see.
Reply
:iconfeathernerd:
FeatherNerd Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
Tyrant LIZARDS?
Tyrannosaurus rex means dominant tyrant reptile. Not tyrant lizard king or whatever
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2016
Aw, it's so cute when people so much more ignorant than me try to school me on dinosaurs.
Tyrannosaurus (/tˌrænəˈsɔːrəs/ or /tˌrænəˈsɔːrəs/, meaning "tyrant lizard", from the Ancient Greek tyrannos (τύραννος), "tyrant", and sauros (σαῦρος), "lizard"[1]) is a genus of coelurosaurian theropod dinosaur.  The species Tyrannosaurus rex (rex meaning "king" in Latin), is one of the most well-represented of the large theropods.
But by all means, explain to me why "tyrannos" translates to "dominant" instead of tyrant, and how reptile and lizard are not synonymous.
(Pssst, if you're thinking of Indominus rex, that's not a real dinosaur!"
Reply
:iconfeathernerd:
FeatherNerd Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
I'm greek you know. And our language is far more complicated than you think. So, don't challenge me...
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2016
Take it up with Huxley, man. He's the one who named the species and the clade.
And for someone who speaks Greek, you seem woefully inept at being able to explain to me why "tyrannos" means "dominant" instead of "tyrant."
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:iconfeathernerd:
FeatherNerd Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
Rex refers to king.. Tyranno refers to tyrant. Saurus refers to lizard and reptile. A mix of these 3 words ends up being dominant tyrant reptile. A mix of these words ends up in different meanings and in nouns becoming adjectives. Get it now?
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2016
Yeah, see? I didn't think you had a good argument for your BS.
Reply
:iconfeathernerd:
FeatherNerd Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
Said the guy who used wikipedia for his arguments
Reply
:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2016
Bahahahaha! Hey, by all means, prove me wrong! Burden of proof is on you, sucker.
Reply
(1 Reply)
:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2016
No. Because no other source in the world thinks T . rex translates to dominant tyrant reptile. Rex is Latin, not Greek, for one thing, so you can't claim your expertise in Greek. Rex means "king", not "dominant". If it WERE "dominant", the Latin part of the scientific name would be Tyrannosaurus dominari. It's not. It's rex. Therefore, the literal translation is "tyrant lizard king." Huxley named it to be the "king of the tyrant lizards" because he thought it was badass.
And every other source in existence says that's the translation, so at this point you're being willfully ignorant about your own stupidity. You even translated every word as "king, tyrant lizard/reptile" and then just magically change it to dominant because you think your ignorance is equal to my facts. Most languages don't change nouns to adjectives between translations, so I'm also calling bullshit on your ability to speak or comprehend Greek, let alone Latin. You're either lying or too stupid to explain properly, neither of which changes the translation. Ask any paleontologist in the world, and they'll tell you you're wrong. Yutyrannus doesn't mean "yu dominant". Eotyrannus doesn't mean "new dominant." Zhuchengtyrannus doesn't mean "Zhucheng dominant."
So unless you can show me a credible source that names T. rex's translated name as your version, you're full of it.
Reply
:iconevodolka:
Evodolka Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2015  Hobbyist Artist
this is pretty cool
thanks for the written advice
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:iconbaconchemist:
BaconChemist Featured By Owner Dec 22, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
So, I've had a newfound interest in dinosaur art. This is extremely useful...

...but spinosaurids (the quadrupedal rendition in specific) are a tough nut to crack, mainly because they are so different than other theropods (mainly because of quadrupedal stuff). I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong but when I draw spinosaurids it always looks... wrong.
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2015
Even the scientists are confused. The "new" rendition is very controversial; many aren't sure if it was quadrupedal.
I think because it's up for debate (and because the only intact skeleton was destroyed by WW2 bombings), you should just have fun with it. I personally prefer bipedal; I think Spinosaurus is entirely too close in physiology to Baryonx, which is the same type of predator: croc-faced fish catcher.
CollectA and Schliech make figures that would be worth studying. They at least attempt scientific accuracy, and I know for a fact they've released a quadruped version of Spino. Also, Shapeways.com has some great dinosaur models molded by 3D paleo enthusiasts; maybe there's a Spinosaurus there worth getting to practice drawing?
(I do this all the time. My dino collection is shameless.)
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:iconbaconchemist:
BaconChemist Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks alot, man! 
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:iconnchamunda:
nchamunda Featured By Owner May 11, 2015  Professional General Artist
This Tutorial on theropod dinosaurs will be useful.
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:iconwikzzz:
Wikzzz Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2015
Thanks for the dinosaur's tutorial
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:iconcrazymira:
CrazyMira Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2014  Student Artist
You should totally do one for birds! Like eagles, ravens, etc :D But this was really helpful!
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2014
I'm not sure how well I know bird anatomy, but I can keep it in mind.
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:iconerikku8:
Erikku8 Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This looks most helpful. Thank you.
Reply
:iconkeesey:
keesey Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2013
This is incorrect. The fifth "digit" is just a metatarsal that wouldn't be externally visible. It *certainly* did not have an ungual (claw)!
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:iconkingpin2007:
Kingpin2007 Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
5 toes? Odd. All conventional representations I know of depict 4. 3 main toes and a small one at the side.
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2013
Depends on the theropod in terms of what was vestigial and what wasn't.

[link]
[link]

"The first toe is separated from the rest of the foot and did not touch the ground. Three elongated toes (digits 2-4) bear the body’s weight. In most theropods, the number of phalanges (toe bones) on the five toes had the following formula: 2-3-4-5-0 (Weishampel, p. 212)"
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:iconkingpin2007:
Kingpin2007 Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Hm. Interesting. Will have to keep more of an eye out next time I'm at a museum...
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:iconkaprisuchus:
kaprisuchus Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013   Traditional Artist
awesome this really helped me
Reply
:iconblazze92:
bLAZZE92 Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2013
You need to do a bit more research.
1.-Carcharodontosaurid "primitive" status has nothing to do with some kind of inferior-superior thing when compared to Tyrannosaurus as you seem to imply(or at least that's what I get from your text), just that the later is more derived, interesting thing to note that the clade from which Carcharodontosauridae evolved from (Allosauroidea) has been producing giant sized theropods since the Jurassic, and all Carcharodontosaurs fall in the "giant" size range. On the other hand, Coelurosaurian theropods (like tyrannosaurs) didn't attain such sizes until the late Cretaceous.
2.- Allosaurus is not a Carcharodontosaurid.

Anyway, good work (:
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:iconjacob-cross:
Jacob-Cross Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2012
Wow...
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:iconvtheyoshi:
vtheyoshi Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is awesome!
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:iconivelon:
ivelon Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2012
Well explained tutorial, thanks!!!!! :love:
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:iconxissorhands:
Xissorhands Featured By Owner May 22, 2012
very useful :)
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:iconboogapig55:
boogapig55 Featured By Owner May 17, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Interesting. Tyrannosaurids' femur and Tibia were about the same length. Also, T-rex had about 20% of its weight devoted to leg muscle. In order for an animal like T-rex to run, with its legs straight or in columnar position, it would have to have 26% of its body weight allotted to leg muscle. It would be even more difficult to run in a crouched position-86% of its body weight would need to be leg muscle. That would be impossible! T-rex could not have run at speeds of even 25 mph! It could have walked at a fast pace but that's about it!
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:iconmanwith0name:
manwith0name Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Hey, this is cool! Good job, and thanks for the reference!
Reply
:iconramenthief:
RamenThief Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2012
Dude thank you.
NOW I CAN FINALLY SEND STUFF TO SMOSH
once I find their p.o. box
and a nearby post office
Reply
:icondotb18:
DOTB18 Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2012
I'd just like to point out that advanced theropods did not have an external fifth toe. It was vestigial to the point where it was imbeded in the flesh of the foot and therefore would not have visible in the living animal. In more primitive forms that did have an external fifth toe, like herrerasaurids and "prosauropods", it still would have lacked a claw, for this was a basal trait found troughout Archosauria.
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2012  Professional General Artist
I know, right? I was like, 5 toes, whut???
Reply
:iconadinosupremacist:
aDinoSupremacist Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2011  Student Digital Artist
Is that Giganotosaurus right above the Form Concept?
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2011
I have no idea. I chose some random fossil from a Google search.
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:iconsajprj:
Sajprj Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2011
I LOVE DINOSAURS!!!! THANK YOU!!
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:iconwindwhispering:
Windwhispering Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
I love dinosaurs ♥ Thanks a lot for the tutorial, it's great ^^
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:iconscribblenautdrawer:
Scribblenautdrawer Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2011
exelent draw
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:iconiacocca:
iacocca Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
helps a lot :)
Reply
:iconkyodracon:
KyoDracon Featured By Owner May 28, 2011  Hobbyist
great! i search for a tutorial like this for a long time!
it's great!
Reply
:iconfuncakes1:
funcakes1 Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2011
I like the on in the bottom right corner... He looks majestic...
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