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April 14, 2013
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1. "I have a problem with your premise." This is the red flag to end all red flags. I don't care how flimsy the premise is. Every idea has the potential to be a good story. Execution is something else entirely, but if somebody doesn't like your idea: don't listen to them. What they're basically saying is "I am not an Ideal Reader, therefore not your target audience, therefore I am not the right person to critiquing your work."  I hate, hate, hate people who think you should be writing for broader audiences than your story is capable of reaching. If you're writing romance, you're writing romance for romance readers. You're not trying to reach hard science fiction readers. Very few people even know what makes a breakout mainstream novel that has high market appeal. If they did, every single book ever written would be Harry Potter. It just doesn't happen. And for somebody to ask you to make that happen is ridiculous and unfair. For the most part, writers are writing to please themselves first, and you don't have to feel bad because your fantasy story is not grabbing the attention of romance readers. It's a freaking fantasy! I had someone in my writing group tell me that she found my psychic dolphin story "ludicrous." She basically said it could never happen. Aside from the fact that that seemed to be missing the point of science fiction and fantasy entirely, it affected her ability to feel basic things about the story like emotional connection to the characters or plot stakes. I went home, incorporated her line edits and punctuation suggestions, because that was all she was capable of giving me aside from telling me "this story doesn't work." She had all sorts of ideas of how she would have done it. That didn't mean they were valuable critique.

2. "This would be better as a ________." I keep hearing that my prose work needs to be graphic novels. I keep hearing that my dinosaur story needs to be for children, not teenagers. I hear all sorts of people say that a chapter book should be a picture book should be a board book.  And boy, do they love bludgeoning you to death with what something should be. It's a very popular pastime. The problem with this is that it's not necessarily your job as a writer to find your market niche. It the job of your literary agent and eventually the marketing team that will be part and parcel of your publication contract. Believe me, these people know how to sell books. And once you get to that point, they will tell you what your book needs to be in order to sell. (Or, with the rise of ebooks, it'll be your own damn job anyway.) However, publication is a long way away for a lot of writers. So this kind of critique just wastes your time. The only time you need to implement this is when a literary agent is telling you so. And odds are, if you think your story is a YA novel, you've landed a literary agent that thinks so, too. Granted, knowing your book's level is important. You need to know the difference between a chapter book, a middle grade book, and a YA novel. But that's very basic research, which should take you about five minutes on Google. It's not rocket science. This sort of critique is smoke screening, the same sort of useless ideamongering that's direct kinship to "Oh you're a writer? I've always wanted to be a writer!" The most important thing to remember about critique is that it's someone else's idea about what your writing should be. A lot of ideas from other people about your writing are good and should be implemented. But not all of it is gold. Sometimes you get really stupid ideas from other people. And you need to trust your judgment to know when something is a stupid idea that will wreck your story to its very heart.

3. "You can't do (insert arbitrary story movement here.)" I have been scolded for not having my protagonist show up in the first 10 pages, despite the same thing happening in Harry Potter, David Clement-Davies's Fire-bringer, and even the story of Jesus Christ. I have been chastised for characterizing before I begin the plot, when everybody knows hundreds of books that take the time to characterize for emotional stakes before the plot begins. For every time someone tells me I can't use a trope, I can pull up an article on TvTropes where that trope has been used successfully. Please note that critiques like "This story movement isn't clear" or "This story movement makes no sense" are not the same thing, and are (or can be) valid critiques. (And if you do hear that, you should pay attention; odds are it's pretty important.) This sort of critique springs from "knowledge" of the market. Mysterious, ethereal "knowledge." Its most common form is when someone is published, and someone who knows that person seems to think that their success is due to a specific formula. Therefore, if your novel falls outside that formula, you can't do it and expect to be successful (i.e. published). Another popular form it takes is when someone goes to a writing seminar and listens to literary agents talk about trends or things they're looking for. Believe me, you will hear at every writing session you ever go to, every literary agent you ever encounter, that "the writing should be good, the characters should leap off the page, the plot should be engaging." That does not mean that if your YA novel is not a paranormal romance it's doomed to failure. Or that this arbitrary thing you've done will doom you for all eternity. (One of the biggest lessons you learn from popular literature is that "good" writing is not the same as "marketable" writing.) It never seems to occur to these people that one literary agent's opinion is just one literary agent's opinion. Or that nobody sees bestsellers coming, and that one book's success becomes the next round of "You can't do (insert arbitrary story movement here because (bestseller) didn't!"

4. "______ is too scary/controversial/morally wrong and shame on you for writing it!"  This one is a double-edged sword that lurks in children's writing groups and among literary agents. Everybody's out to sell books, and for some reason it never seems to occur to these naysayers that controversy sells just as well as good wholesome morality (or better). The younger you go, the more scrutiny you're under to be politically correct, but I've seen people who write YA scolded for having sexuality in their books and, no joke, a children's picture book where a dog chases off thieves being scolded for "too much real-life fear for a child." When writing becomes a social event, it can be a lot of pressure on a writer given to the demands of the audience. Regardless of whether it's your target audience or not. I've seen entire stories wrecked by this. The climax is too controversial, so every single building block of the story leading up to it gets demolished. And more often than not, the story gets destroyed in the process. It just becomes this bland, happy, generic thing. This rubs me the wrong way as an artist, and as somebody who feels of the role of the artist is to be controversial. To forge new paths and make new statements. Given the "Hollywood" trends of a lot of YA literature, we need more original, breakout stuff with profound and real things to say. Not less of it. I can freely admit that a lot of people write for the express purpose or being published, not to make an artistic statement. But I maintain that this attitude is an insidious one. I believe it has a direct correlation with the cookie-cutter YA that keeps telling the same story over and over and over, in ever narrowing margins. I'm not published yet, but if that were the sort of feedback I got from a literary agent, I would not implement it. I just don't think it's valid critique to be told "you can't" rather than "this is done well despite the controversy and stands on its own merits despite breaking from the norms."

5. "Well, I don't read (genre), but I don't like (obvious genre element) and think you should cut it."  This gets back to the Ideal Reader thing. I can't stress how much a difference it makes to have an Ideal Reader. And Ideal Reader is not somebody that will tell you "I love everything you write!" An Ideal Reader is more than likely a member of your target audience. I have had my fantasy worlds scolded for being too detailed. What I think is an intriguing and interesting detail, my writing group often accuses me of world-builder's disease. Each is its own battle, and sometimes they make good points, but nonetheless I balance every bit of critique I receive with the knowledge of fantasy that I like to read. But when somebody starts telling me they don't like magic or psychic dolphins, that kind of critique is going to go in one ear and out the other for me. I read fantasy. I read a lot of fantasy; I read a lot of types of fantasy. I read fantasy on different reading levels. I read myths and fairytales and have studied deconstructions of myths and fairytales. So when someone who's never read a fantasy novel in their life starts telling me how to handle my fantasy, I don't have to listen to that. I have the right to trust my own judgment when it comes to an element about the genre I adore. Again, please note that things like "This element isn't clear" or "This element doesn't make sense", that is not the same criticism. This is when someone tells you to remove your psychic dolphins from your psychic dolphin story because their premise is too ludicrous. This is someone telling you your romance novel has too much romance in it and could you ease up on the steamy scenes already? This is a grey area for sure, when someone starts telling you to remove the part of your genre that makes it your genre, that's another pretty big red flag. You need to put on the brakes and examine where this person is coming from before you start to doubt yourself.
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:iconjakerulez17:
JakeRulez17 Featured By Owner Edited Jan 25, 2015
In regards to controversy, it seems like a lot of the time, writers think they can just write about hot button topics without doing proper research. Things that will get people upset, which was perhaps the intended reaction, but they don't really convey it properly. The most appropriate example I can think of is "writer has a female characters get hurt/raped/killed/depowered/have something horrible happen to them just to develop another character's reaction, often a male one."

Now, like you said, any idea has potential to be good if it's written well. That includes discussions about controversial topics. The idea is not to just include "adult" elements like rape into a story just for the sake of drama or as a plot device, but as an actual method of character development. If, for example, someone wrote a story about a world where ghosts are real, I think it would interesting to see all the aspects of life where the ghosts' presence impacts society.

Personally speaking, I think a good way to handle controversy is to not take sides. Certain writers pour their own beliefs into stories and characters far too often, and just say things like "Abortion is bad because it's bad" or "We should support this country because they're not our enemy", or whatever. The best way to handle it, I think, is to not take sides, analyze the pros and cons of a topic, and let the readers decide for themselves.

Characters aren't meant to be mouthpieces for your own beliefs. They're meant to be fictional people with their own beliefs. Have them discuss what they think is right, wrong, or morally ambiguous.

Above all, do the research.
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:iconleahplainandtallish:
LeahPlainAndTallish Featured By Owner Jun 12, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Nothing makes me crosser than when someone who does not enjoy fantasy tells me no one is going to be interested in reading my novels. 'Too detailed', 'too verbose', 'too many place names' and 'that's just not believable' are some of the critiques I've been hit with - and I write light, low, occasionally quite humorous fantasies! It's just not helpful. If some truly dislikes a genre, they should not waste their or the author's time finding fault in it, particularly when all they are really hating on are expected, beloved tropes. I tell you, that just burns my bacon! Family and friends are some of the worst for this, which is why it's so important to get out there and gather relevant feedback from folk who actually might be interested in buying your book. I hate to think about how many young novices have had their creativity crushed by peers who don't even really get what they are trying to do or say.
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:iconalexartwork:
AlexArtwork Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2013
It takes a lot to disregard words, even from a stranger.

To stand firm to your ground, yet at the same time, knowing when to take in critic is really difficult.

Great words! ^_^
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:iconoceanblue-art:
Oceanblue-Art Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2013  Student General Artist
@#1- A good writer can come up with a good premise. A *great* writer can take a bad premise and make it worth reading by using rich language, creating deep characters, etc. ("It," anyone?) 
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:icondmrman:
DMRMan Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2013
Droemar,

In my studies to become a video game developer. I call it Visual Interactive Story Developer... but that's just me. I have had several people come up to me and in various manners say "Your story is far to controversial." Or something to that effect. One notable occurrence happened while I was at my previous college. We had just finished the book The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  by Mark Twain and had to write an essay and present it to the class. The class topic was "How we have changed since the time of Huckleberry Finn." During my presentation I used a certain word that starts with the letter n and ends with an er, in relation to the story and historical time period itself. I was failed for the entire class because the professor said I used inappropriate language. Even though he never specified any rules for the presentation and he seemingly forgot that we had read  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn which is set in the American South between 1835 and 1845. I would never use that word outside of a historical context.

This just goes to show that if I am not making you, the reader/video game player, uncomfortable with a topic, then I am not doing my job at making connections to real life issues.
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:iconatlantathearistocrat:
AtlantaTheAristocrat Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Droemar, I can't thank you enough for your tips and your e-book; The Sarcastic Guide to Writing. I am now inspired to create an original story of my own and I'm reading and rereading your helpfull book on my laptop. Thanks so much for the tips and e-book.
Also; I'm running out of some good fiction to read and I would like some recomendations on some literature you have read.
Another thing; how's The Mark of the Conifier comming? It sounds like a book that I'd like to read.
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2013
You're very welcome. I'm glad you found the book helpful.
I really haven't found a whole lot lately ... there's always my usual: Watership Down, Fire-Bringer by David Celement Davies, the Firebringer Trilogy by Meredith Ann Pierce, Scorpio Races by Maggie Stiefvater, Garth Nix's Abhorsen Trilogy, His Dark Materials trilogy, Bartimeaus trilogy by Jonathan Stroud, the Redwall Series by Brian Jacques (earlier ones are good stuff, later ones ... uh ... not so much.)
Mark of the Conifer is still in rewrites. It looks like it might be an ebook; not a lot of folks want to take a chance on dinos, it seems.
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:iconatlantathearistocrat:
AtlantaTheAristocrat Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks for the recomendations.
Glad to know that it is still being worked on. My opinion; I'd like to read a story that challenges people's concept of dinosaurs.
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:iconsnurtz:
snurtz Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2013  Student Writer
This is fantastic! Thank you for writing this. I feel encouraged!
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:iconmurasaki99:
Murasaki99 Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Tsk, tsk, you just need to add some romance to those dolphins and make them psychic VAMPIREs wrapped up in a sad love triangle and all will be well for your YA novel! :XD: Needless to say, my tongue is firmly in my cheek. Good points all in your article.

The "you can't do XYZ in a novel" argument is made to be ignored. We can do anything in writing... if it is done well. :)
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2013
Couldn't have said it better myself!
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:iconnick-matulich:
Nick-Matulich Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Thanks
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:iconforgottendreamssf:
ForgottenDreamsSF Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013
I like this journal. Different from your usual 5 tips- it's a bit more positive and serious.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I have to say that seeing this makes me not want to critique you. Regardless of its utility, people are taking time out of their lives to let you know what concerns they have with the story. It's one thing to say critiques can be off base and another to act as if you will never make mistakes so large that you need someone else to point them out.
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013
Opinions are like assholes, especially on the internet. I don't have to be grateful that somebody decided to tell me how they would have done my idea. Their time would be better spent elsewhere, like, say, making their own ideas above reproach.
Anyone who thinks all critique is worth listening to is a fool.
Reply
:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I hope you post this as a disclaimer on your work.

People only notice stuff like a bad premise when the writer isn't pulling it off because they're not as good a writer as, say, Christopher Moore. So something is off about the work, just not the concept. Critiques can be wrong about what is off with the piece, if authors can't be arsed to complete the thought process then that's on them.
Reply
:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013
I don't post it as a disclaimer. Really, I shouldn't have to, but alas, I have to deal with people offering advice whether I want it or not.
And no, someone not liking a premise doesn't automatically mean it's because the writer is bad. Stephen King and J. K. Rowling have their detractors, too.
Reply
:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
If you don't say you don't want advice, it's hard to take the moral high ground when refusing it, I've found.

That is not what I said.
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2013
It's a never-ending source of amusement to me when people mistake their opinions for facts.
You know so much better than me? Write your own writing tips blog.
And by the way: I never asked you to critique me. :)
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I was never critiquing you. ;)
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:iconraspil:
raspil Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013   Writer
it drives me nuts when i get the "i didn't like this/it bugs me/it's a peeve of mine" crit BS. i'm like, i don't care what you don't like and what am i supposed to do about it. i got some of that the other day and in the end, i was the pompous asshole for asking how i could improve what they didn't like and then not thinking their idea was golden. i'm totally up for hearing something that can be improved technically but once someone starts messing with my voice/style because it's what they don't like, i put my foot down. i don't even care when someone doesn't like what i write but to tell me they don't like it and/or don't offer up any ideas that might be better or change it to suit their preferences... this site sometimes, i swear.
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:iconbonbon3272:
bonbon3272 Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Someone once told me my main character would be better off as a girl because it worked for that person's story. After thinking about it, I decided to just beef up the manliness of the child. It was a ten-year-old character, after all, lol. At the same time, I get a reader who, after reading one scene says if you read Robin Hood, it's the same type of description. Just pick up a book of England and you know the scenes in the book. Wow... I never realized having a forest in your book was from Robin Hood, lol.
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:iconaemi:
Aemi Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Personally, I like bad critiques. If my writing moved someone enough to bitch about it then I know I won as an artist! It's the lack of replies that kills me.

Not that I cater to them, mind you.

My all time favorite bad critique came not from my work but from a friend. He was working on a survival style story where the readers voted on who they wanted to see kicked out. One person was SO MAD that he was voted out that he wrote out a chart on how it should have gone, with my character (who had beat him in votes) getting killed off and some other character falling in love with a random sentient pizza slice. I kid you not. He seriously thought injecting sentient food for all of a half paragraph for a completely irrelevant romance scene would have made everything better as his character goes on to win it all. And apparently I wasn't qualified to comment on the story at all since he (18 years old) had been writing for way longer than I had even been alive (26 years old). If I hadn't been so mad at him I would have died laughing.

The things some people do.

My boyfriend also had "world-builder's disease" at once point. One of his stories introduced all the main characters in the first page (and I use the term page loosely here), with full in depth descriptions of hair, eyes, clothing, hair STYLES, accessories... I think he stopped just short of the thread count of their shoelaces. Thankfully he was mocked so much that he stopped doing it, and since has gotten somewhat better at writing.
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:iconbonbon3272:
bonbon3272 Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
It's nice to read points like this. I recently just critiqued a person's story, not because I was asked to, but was asked as an illustrator to do paintings for it. Now maybe it's because I'm not into children's books at the moment, and don't get me wrong, this person's story was very creative. But when someone tells me they don't know who their target audience is, I get a little worried. If you don't know your target audience, how am I supposed to give valid pictures? How does your story make sense to a child when it's not at his or her reading level? It was clear this was her first story and she was attached to it. I've been there, so I understand her feelings. But I was confused at baby talk mixed with normal talk, then including the narrarator as a character, then having a character talk to the narrator while the main characters stayed confused, then having your two-year-old suddenly sound adult??? So I backed out of the project... It needed some fine tuning, but the idea behind the project was sound!
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:iconraspil:
raspil Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013   Writer
awesome stuff.
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:iconlantairvlea:
lantairvlea Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
*Taps microphone.* Hi, my name is Cori, and I have a world-building problem. They say admission is the first step to recovery ...

Good stuff. I love it when people say things like "this is great, but it would be better if it was *insert alternate animal/subject/whatever*". Seriously people?
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:iconsidequestpubs:
SideQuestPubs Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
What is this, World Builders Anonymous? :D
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:iconlantairvlea:
lantairvlea Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yes, yes it is.
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:iconiamoret:
iAmoret Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
The Jesus thing made my day. :D
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:iconmistingwolf:
MistingWolf Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
A very nice read.
On this topic, I was told that I couldn't start my book the way I started it. She didn't give me any reasons as to why, so I totally ignored it.
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:iconrebel-mel:
Rebel-Mel Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Student Digital Artist
Number four seriously bugs me every time I see it... not to mention it's backed by extremely faulty logic. What's the cut off age for innocence? When can people read about genocide and rape without their minds being warped?

It especially bugs me in the context of sexuality and YA... particularly since it's usually about controlling how girls see and express their own sexuality... but I digress.
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:iconpopurii:
popurii Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
I'm so happy I read this.
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:iconfurrama:
Furrama Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013   Digital Artist
I'm still at the stage where I get weird looks when I describe my premise. I've gotten quite good at explaining what it's about without actually going into details. But then I bring in the two tailed feathered cat beasts and a climactic battle between a giant dog golem and a world destroying dragon and I lose people.

This is usually followed up by, " No, I promise it makes sense!" Then the general feelings of shame come.
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:iconsidequestpubs:
SideQuestPubs Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
So what you need is readers who enjoy the weird stuff? ;)
Count me in!
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:iconkaljaia:
Kaljaia Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013
I tried to describe my premise involving swords, dragons and space ships to a bunch of people once. I got a lot of very funny looks and not a few 'you can't do that' statements. Then I realized everyone in the group was two to three times my age. :P Sometimes it's not the premise... it's the people.
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:iconmissdudette:
MissDudette Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013
Epic sauce as usual.
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:iconsharpfang:
Sharpfang Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013
What about:

1. your premise has been written into the ground and you don't add anything new on top of your 1000 predecessors? There were ones that did it better. You're not a genius so your execution won't top theirs; pick a better premise.

2. While I mostly agree there are story-media pairs that just click and ones that simply don't work. Seriously, 20 pages of talking heads in a comic book suck. It would make a great audio play, a reasonable book, but sucks as a graphic novel.

3. no argument here.

4. no argument, actually my pet peeve.

5. This is a double-edged sword. So you've made a name as a fantasy writer. Now you wrote a contemporary political fiction. Let me say as your avid reader I don't like what you did. I don't read that genre so take my opinion with a grain of salt, but I really don't like [element] so if I'm alone, feel free to ignore me, but if you gather 50 opinions like mine, better reconsider it.
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013
I'd still make the argument that premise is independent of execution. High fantasy stock world is a premise. You can have an awesome execution or it, like Song of Ice and Fire, or shitty execution, like Eragon.
As for #5, I take what Stephen King said. "I have a love for the unquiet coffin, is all. If you don't like it, I'm sorry. It's all I've got."
Even if an author who normally wrote fantasy wrote contemporary political fiction wasn't your thing: it's all they've got. They've got the right to write it (despite what the Internet says) as much as the fans have the right not to dislike it.
Reply
:iconsharpfang:
Sharpfang Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013
1. Depends how detailed you want to go with the premise. "High fantasy world" is a premise. What about a premise of "A strange substance that overgrows and absorbs all organic matter is found. As its growth threatens all life on Earth, a common, easily available method/substance/process that causes destruction of said substance is discovered, then employed by a group of unlikely heroes to save the day." - do you believe you could follow it without major twists and create something briliant and captivating for people who'd seen a dozen of variants of the above?


As for number five, "it's your right to create it, it's my right to express my dislike, it's your right to ignore me or argue with me." Still, if given "uninformed" opinion is prevalent, one should consider whether it doesn't contain any merit. Just consider - I mean, I'm sure mrs Rowling gets a lot of negative feedback from fundamentalist christians. I mean: Don't discard it without consideration. Discard it after consideration.
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:iconumbbe:
umbbe Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013  Student Digital Artist
(unfair to the audience too, I suppose, but I imagine the person wouldn't drop their roots entirely if they did what they did because they loved it instead of for attention. Regardless.)
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:iconumbbe:
umbbe Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013  Student Digital Artist
I personally think of it like I think of visual arts.
When someone who is known for drawing a lot of Zelda fanart (for example) starts drawing horror/macabre original work, does it not seem unfair that the audience starts shouting them down for changing their genre on them like that?

It is a fault if the book is marketed like it's fantasy but it's not, but if it's clear that it's a political story, then you can avoid it.
You don't need to agree with someone on every count to admire them and like their work.
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:iconprinceofpride:
PrinceofPride Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
"______ is too scary/controversial/morally wrong and shame on you for writing it!"

I tend to hear this one a lot, and this is the one that irks me the most. Also hate it when someone criticizes your story because "the ending isn't happy enough, it made me sad so it's a bad story."
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:iconjerepasaurus:
Jerepasaurus Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I loved this so hard. Another helpful piece and another of my favorites from you so far.

Something that really caught my interest was your term, "world-builder's disease". This seems like a huge subject itself, and if you have the time, I beg you to talk with us/post something about this in the future. I would desperately love to know what is considered "too much" or "too little" in a headworld. I've spent years working on my ideas, and sometimes I wonder how bad it might be that I'd know more about a world's local forestry service than I would about where exactly to focus my main character's travels over a certain expanse of time.
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:iconneilak20:
neilak20 Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
I've gotten "This isn't my 'cup of tea' " quite a bit :x
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013
I will drink any tea you've got anytime, Neila.
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:iconneilak20:
neilak20 Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
I'm learning to brew my cup of tea better and could always use someone with a more diverse and experienced palette to help taste test. :P Often times family tells me it's not to their taste. They tune out then or say "This story would be way better if it was X" and "x" is never anything remotely related to the material I showed them. :x

I just wrote a short story I hope to submit to [link] if you want to read it. :D
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:icondroemar:
Droemar Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013
Send me a note.
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:iconneilak20:
neilak20 Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Note sent.
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:iconomniwitch:
OmniWitch Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Professional Writer
I haaattteee number 4. Most of the things I write are YA to adult fiction, and loose-end members of my writing group still wagged their fingers at me for all the imaginary children whose innocence I destroyed. With talking mice and wolves, I guess?

This is super funny to me because a lot of J fiction is violent as hell. Warriors, Seekers, Guardians of Gahoole, Wolves of the Beyond, Silverwing, Fire-Bringer, Tailchaser's Song, Watership Down. There are gory animal deaths all over the place, yet parents and critics never seem to see past the cute protagonists.
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:iconbonbon3272:
bonbon3272 Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
You're right. Watership Down was gory as hell! But it was such a good story!!!
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